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   All Posts (IronDioPriest)


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Re: flourocarbon line
LSF Member
Joined:
09/16/2014
Posts: 121
I switched all my walleye jig and rig rods over to straight flouro, as well as all my bass finesse rods, and I will never go back. I'll explain why...

The downside is, as you suspect, an increased tendency for the line to loosen up and cause management issues. But I've found that once you're experienced with how it behaves, that tendency can be all but negated with a little extra attention to controlling the line on your cast, and making sure it reels in with some tension, and without loops. Line conditioner helps a ton, but I've gotten to where I don't even need to mess with that.

Flouro has a "crispy" feel as it spools off the reel. That took a little getting used to. And to be safe, I retie more often than I would with mono. Knots in flouro must be tied correctly, and watched for loosening. Check the line for nicks.

So with the downsides out of the way, here's the benefits from my point of view. The main benefit is quite simple: the most efficient transfer of kinetic energy from whatever touches my lure, to my fingertips. For this reason, whenever feeling the bite is crucial to successful fishing, I use flouro.

Mono floats. Braid floats more. So as your lure is sinking into the strike zone, there is arc in the line. With mono, that arc is compounded by the elasticity of monofilament. Something touches your line when there is arc in it, you are less likely to feel it than if there is no arc in it. And because both those options float, there is ALWAYS arc in the line - which is to say, your line is always trying to float to the surface. When something touches it, the first thing that will "give" is that arc in the line, no matter how minute it is. Only when the fish/weed/rock/stick creates full-on tension will that transfer of kinetic energy be near equivalent to a straight transfer of energy. Mono has elasticity, further reducing the transfer of energy - braid does not suffer from any elasticity, so when it is at full tension, it is the best transfer of energy - but only when it is at full tension.

Flouro is basically neutral-bouyant, and will sink slowly. So your lure falls into the strike zone with no resistance other than line cutting through water. The moment you take up the slack, the line is tight and there is no arc. Because there is no elasticity and no arc, you have a direct connection between your lure and your hand for the transfer of kinetic energy of whatever touches your lure.

Of course a good sensitive rod is another key component to this setup. But that said, I will never go back to mono for those finesse/jigging applications. My hookup percentages have gone WAY up since I started using flouro for finesse and jig. I only use mono for bobber fishing; braid or mono for cranks, spinner-baits, buzz-baits, topwaters, etc.

Posted on: Yesterday 10:05:00
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Re: Wild Asparagus~
LSF Member
Joined:
09/16/2014
Posts: 121
I had absolutely no idea.

Posted on: Yesterday 9:46:54
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Re: How are 13 casting rods?
LSF Member
Joined:
09/16/2014
Posts: 121
I don't know about the 13s, but I agree with you about the St. Croixs. I know lots of guys love them, but every one I've used has felt clunky.

Posted on: 5/24 19:58:45
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Re: Outboard Repair Place
LSF Member
Joined:
09/16/2014
Posts: 121
I don't know about Andover/Anoka, but if youre willing to go to Albertville, Protech Marine has done good work for me at a fair price.

Posted on: 5/24 18:32:43
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Re: Trying out topwaters. Should I be worried about northern teeth?
LSF Member
Joined:
09/16/2014
Posts: 121
A heavier test flouro or braid leader is another excellent idea. When tying lines of different type/diameter, this knot works well...

http://www.animatedknots.com/albright/index.php?Categ=fishing&LogoImage=LogoGrog.png&Website=www.animatedknots.com#ScrollPoint

Posted on: 5/22 21:34:33
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Re: Trying out topwaters. Should I be worried about northern teeth?
LSF Member
Joined:
09/16/2014
Posts: 121
Wire leaders will hedge your bet against losing your lure to a pike, but it will definitely mess up the action of your topwater.

If it was me... Pike will hit topwater, but are less likely to hit topwater than they are to hit diving baits like a tail dancer, shad rap, or spinner bait. 12lb test is good. A little heavier (17) might be better, but 12 is good strong line. I'd bring a few extra lures, set my drag stiff to get fish into the boat quickly and directly without a lot of head-thrashing, and retie often - definitely after every pike, walleye, or larger bass. If doing that or using a steel leader are my two choices, I'd avoid the steel leader.

Obviously it's your choice, and your mileage may vary.

Posted on: 5/22 20:26:35
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Re: Cranking Battery Question...
LSF Member
Joined:
09/16/2014
Posts: 121
Quote:

dew2 wrote:
Quote:

IronDioPriest wrote:
So... I charged the battery to full with the charger set on 10 amp setting according to Some advice I got. (Until now, I have always used the 2 amp setting.) After fully charged, I removed the charger and let it sit for about 12 hours. Volt tested this morning at 12.72 at the battery terminals.

I turned on the master switch and volt tested again, and it read 12.70.
I turned on the console graph and it volt tested at 12.65.
I turned on one of the bow graphs and it volt tested at 12.55.
I turned on the 3rd graph and it volt tested at 12.50.
Finally, I turned them all off, and turned off the master switch, and the battery tested at 12.62.

What, if anything, does this tell me?
console graph had a draw of .05. bow had a draw of .10 twice the amount? then the other 3ed graph dropped voltage .05.the master switch dropped .02.I think you have a wire short somewhere between bow graph an master switch.Seeing the other two draw .05 and one draws .10.Turning on a master switch shouldnt draw any power not untill a source to use power is turned on. The battery drop leads me to think a short in there


The console graph uses a puck, and from what I understand, whenever there is power to the unit, the GPS draws current whether the graph is on or not. Also, my gauges all light up when the master switch is in the on position. So there is some draw of current when the master switch is on, even if it is a little bit.

Still, I will consider your advice. Quite possible there is a short.

Posted on: 5/17 18:48:59
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Re: Cranking Battery Question...
LSF Member
Joined:
09/16/2014
Posts: 121
So... I charged the battery to full with the charger set on 10 amp setting according to Some advice I got. (Until now, I have always used the 2 amp setting.) After fully charged, I removed the charger and let it sit for about 12 hours. Volt tested this morning at 12.72 at the battery terminals.

I turned on the master switch and volt tested again, and it read 12.70.
I turned on the console graph and it volt tested at 12.65.
I turned on one of the bow graphs and it volt tested at 12.55.
I turned on the 3rd graph and it volt tested at 12.50.
Finally, I turned them all off, and turned off the master switch, and the battery tested at 12.62.

What, if anything, does this tell me?

Posted on: 5/17 12:15:39
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Re: Cranking Battery Question...
LSF Member
Joined:
09/16/2014
Posts: 121
Great info fellas,thank you!

Posted on: 5/16 12:05:52
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Re: Cranking Battery Question...
LSF Member
Joined:
09/16/2014
Posts: 121
Quote:

MarkBruzek wrote:
If you could post the make, type of battery (cranking or deep cycle) amount of cranking amps and the reserve capacity it would really help to give the best feedback. Without that info it is tough to speculate. Also maintenance schedule for the battery helps.

You may be over-drawing that battery, add a second deep cycle for your graphs and such, maybe run only one graph off the starting battery. Otherwise you could link 2 batteries together and run all that off of them but yo really want 2 equal condition batteries linked not an old and new as the new battery will fail prematurely.

Secondly, if you have not maintained your battery water levels you will see premature failure of the batteries (assuming they are lead/acid batteries). I leave my batteries plugged in most of the year and find myself adding about 2 cups of distilled water in the spring and 2 cups in the fall. Low water will kill the battery and I suspect that may be your issue with a relatively new battery.


Hi Mark. I included the specs you asked for at the end of my post above. The only think I didn't include was the name brand - it is a NAPA cranking battery. The water levels are good, and I charge it between outings - an "outing" being a day on the water, or 5 days at Lac Seul - I never let it sit uncharged for any length of time.

I literally do not have room for a 2nd battery. My trolling motor is 36v, and between that and the cranking battery, there is just no space.

It IS an automotive cranking battery as opposed to a marine cranking battery. I don't know what the difference is. Could that be my issue?

Posted on: 5/16 9:30:50
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