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flourocarbon line
LSF Member
Joined:
12/27/2009
From South Metro
Posts: 112
Outside of the cost, what are downsides to a full spool of flouro on a spinning reel? Being its a little stiffer than mono, will it have a tendency to "spring" or backlash off a spinning reel? I do use it tied onto a mono backer as a leader, but was wondering if anyone has used it full spool, and has any observations to share...

thanks -

SD

Posted on: 5/26 6:48:34
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Re: flourocarbon line
LSF Member
Joined:
07/04/2016
Posts: 7
It is a little better than mono for being bite proof for pike. I use it to make walleye spinners. I also use in on my trout spinning reels in 4 pound test. It likes to get twists in it even running swivel clips.

My opinion, run power pro or fireline with 12' to 4' berkley vanish leader depending on the body of water you are fishing.

Posted on: 5/26 7:46:48
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Re: flourocarbon line
LSF Member
Joined:
07/18/2013
Posts: 515
SavageDaddy,

I did exactly what you are inquiring about, last year, I filled a spinning reel up with Flouro. It was OK, and you can get by with it, but it does tend to spring a bit and I had more reel tangles than usual. I went back to running PowerPro braid spools with Flouro leaders and I am much happier.

Just of note, all of the Gander Mountains I have been in have a TON of their branded lines on the clearance sale. Cheap spool filler. I was told, but cannot substantiate, that the Gander brand Flouro is made by Sunline, and if it is even close to Sunline quality, that is an awesome deal. I have used their braid, and it is OK, but I would never use it other than a spool filler, don't like it that much compared to PowerPro.

Posted on: 5/26 9:13:08
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Re: flourocarbon line
LSF Member
Joined:
09/16/2014
Posts: 168
I switched all my walleye jig and rig rods over to straight flouro, as well as all my bass finesse rods, and I will never go back. I'll explain why...

The downside is, as you suspect, an increased tendency for the line to loosen up and cause management issues. But I've found that once you're experienced with how it behaves, that tendency can be all but negated with a little extra attention to controlling the line on your cast, and making sure it reels in with some tension, and without loops. Line conditioner helps a ton, but I've gotten to where I don't even need to mess with that.

Flouro has a "crispy" feel as it spools off the reel. That took a little getting used to. And to be safe, I retie more often than I would with mono. Knots in flouro must be tied correctly, and watched for loosening. Check the line for nicks.

So with the downsides out of the way, here's the benefits from my point of view. The main benefit is quite simple: the most efficient transfer of kinetic energy from whatever touches my lure, to my fingertips. For this reason, whenever feeling the bite is crucial to successful fishing, I use flouro.

Mono floats. Braid floats more. So as your lure is sinking into the strike zone, there is arc in the line. With mono, that arc is compounded by the elasticity of monofilament. Something touches your line when there is arc in it, you are less likely to feel it than if there is no arc in it. And because both those options float, there is ALWAYS arc in the line - which is to say, your line is always trying to float to the surface. When something touches it, the first thing that will "give" is that arc in the line, no matter how minute it is. Only when the fish/weed/rock/stick creates full-on tension will that transfer of kinetic energy be near equivalent to a straight transfer of energy. Mono has elasticity, further reducing the transfer of energy - braid does not suffer from any elasticity, so when it is at full tension, it is the best transfer of energy - but only when it is at full tension.

Flouro is basically neutral-bouyant, and will sink slowly. So your lure falls into the strike zone with no resistance other than line cutting through water. The moment you take up the slack, the line is tight and there is no arc. Because there is no elasticity and no arc, you have a direct connection between your lure and your hand for the transfer of kinetic energy of whatever touches your lure.

Of course a good sensitive rod is another key component to this setup. But that said, I will never go back to mono for those finesse/jigging applications. My hookup percentages have gone WAY up since I started using flouro for finesse and jig. I only use mono for bobber fishing; braid or mono for cranks, spinner-baits, buzz-baits, topwaters, etc.

Posted on: 5/26 10:05:00
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Re: flourocarbon line
LSF Member
Joined:
01/08/2012
From Mankato
Posts: 68
i switched to trilene 100% fluorocarbon XL.... right on the box it says unique formula for spinning reels & in my opinion it has been an improvement over how other fluorocarbons have preformed on my spinning reels. I also use it only in 6lb or less which seems to help. I also never fill the spool over 3/4th full.

Posted on: 5/30 9:51:25
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Re: flourocarbon line
LSF Member
Joined:
05/20/2005
Posts: 102
I use straight flouro on my trolling rod and jigging rod. I use mono on my bobber rod. I use braid, with a leader for rigging.

No issues for me having a full flouro spool. I use Vanish Transition.

Posted on: 5/30 10:14:07
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Re: flourocarbon line
LSF Member
Joined:
11/22/2014
From St Michael
Posts: 303
I found it to be very difficult to manage. It would leap off the spool, get tangled around itself, and have terrible memory once cast. Plus, it needs to be changed a lot me frequently. I go 10#suffix braid main line to a 15 foot fluro leader 8-10# tied with an FG knot. I have had no issues with this setup.

Posted on: 5/30 10:28:33
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Re: flourocarbon line
LSF Member
Joined:
12/14/2014
From Duluth
Posts: 151
Used trilene 100%fluoro 6# on my new summit XT with a 7' cabelas walleye prodigy rod.
In some ways reminiscent of old mono used as a kid. But strength/size ratio is nice. Casting smaller jigs was a little cumbersome but doable,might rig my ultra light with some 2# and give it a try.
Overall happy with it,but definitely different from the others.

Posted on: 5/30 10:42:22
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