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Re: De-Listing of the Wolf
Field Staff
Joined:
12/18/2012
From South Minneapolis
Posts: 1879
Quote:

brian6715 wrote:

To me the answer is simple, they are ranching in wolf territory and that is a risk they have to be willing to take (and it's an extremely miniscule risk). Same as ranchers in the south dealing with extreme heat and drought, ranchers in the west dealing with grizzlies/coyotes/snow, ranchers up-north dealing with extreme cold, etc. It's mother nature, the wolf has more right to the territory than we do, whether some want to admit it or not. A very small amount of livestock predation doesn't justify hunting them. Numbers are not out of control now, and if they do over populate, the prey cycle will naturally reduce the population. It's mother nature, we need to stay out of it, even if our precious deer hunting is diminished.


The problem is there were 0 wolves in the area when he built and started his ranch. I understand what you are saying but the prey cycle will not naturally reduce their population if they have easy prey like livestock available to them. If you fully take humans out of the equation you would be right, but you are missing that part of the equation.

Posted on: 3/9 7:51:06
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Re: De-Listing of the Wolf
LSF Member
Joined:
01/02/2011
Posts: 5
the wolf needs no one to take care of it. It is the top predator. they are smart and can take care of themselves. they should have a controlled hunting and trapping season so they learn to be afraid of humans and human contact that way they lean to stay away from people pets cattle etc. they are smart. thats why it took over 200 yrs. to push them into Canada with clearing of the land, bounty hunted year round,poison meat,cyanide traps,federal trappers,dens decimated killed and shot on site etc I am sure I forgot a few. my point is they are a canine like a fox, coyote, or wolf are a renewable resource there are too many. Too keep a healthy population they need to be controlled like all other wild life. They are being controlled by federal trappers now but will not once they are (Finally)removed from the endangered spices list they should have never been on,they have never been endangered. Look up the grey wolf,once they are removed the cost of controlling them will go to the state thousands of dollars. With a limited hunting and trapping season they can be controlled at a limited cost and maybe generate some revenue for the dnr. They are top predator are very smart and will learn again to avoid people pets farms roads etc. help the moose population,deer population,wolf genetics,health of the population. With a limited hunting trapping season we will be able to have a healthy resource for many years. Wolfs need to relearn how to be afraid of people so they are not having contact with pets people cattle etc. Again they are smart. they are a renewable resource just another fur barer nothing mythical just another canine that could use controll

Posted on: 3/9 19:44:20
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Re: De-Listing of the Wolf
LSF Member
Joined:
01/05/2008
From St. Paul, MN
Posts: 2152
Quote:

bottlebass wrote:
Quote:

brian6715 wrote:

To me the answer is simple, they are ranching in wolf territory and that is a risk they have to be willing to take (and it's an extremely miniscule risk). Same as ranchers in the south dealing with extreme heat and drought, ranchers in the west dealing with grizzlies/coyotes/snow, ranchers up-north dealing with extreme cold, etc. It's mother nature, the wolf has more right to the territory than we do, whether some want to admit it or not. A very small amount of livestock predation doesn't justify hunting them. Numbers are not out of control now, and if they do over populate, the prey cycle will naturally reduce the population. It's mother nature, we need to stay out of it, even if our precious deer hunting is diminished.


The problem is there were 0 wolves in the area when he built and started his ranch. I understand what you are saying but the prey cycle will not naturally reduce their population if they have easy prey like livestock available to them. If you fully take humans out of the equation you would be right, but you are missing that part of the equation.


Not only were there no wolves, there were few to no deer in the lower portion of MN before the Wolves were exterminated so there was no need for them to move south for a food source so they stayed in northern MN.
As the food supply falls below the carrying capacity of the wolf packs, they will start eating domesticated animals in higher numbers and/or they will move south to follow more plentiful food supplies. i.e. deer herds. The wolf needs to be managed just like the deer, geese, ducks, fish, etc.

Posted on: 3/9 19:47:14
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Re: De-Listing of the Wolf
LSF Member
Joined:
12/14/2014
From Duluth
Posts: 321
Article in Duluth News Tribune today says 2/3 of moose calf ,1/3rd of adult mortality rates due to wolves in Minnesota. Annually.

Posted on: 3/11 19:40:30
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Re: De-Listing of the Wolf
LSF Member
Joined:
05/07/2008
From Cambridge, MN
Posts: 643
Right, a lot of people would appreciate a Moose for the family, how many eat Wolves.

Posted on: 3/13 22:28:51
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